Quick Answer: What Happens When You Go To Crown Court?

What happens at first hearing in Crown Court?

The first hearing at Crown Court after the case has been sent by the Magistrates is the Plea and Trial Preparation Hearing (“PTPH”).

Usually being the only hearing before trial, it is expected arraignment will occur unless there is good reason why it should not..

How long does a case take to go to crown court?

How long does it take for a case to go to Crown Court? It is impossible to predict how long a case will take to go to any court – however, on average it can take up to six months for a case to go to magistrates’ court and up to a year for a case to reach Crown Court.

What happens if you plead not guilty in Crown Court?

Pleading not guilty means that you say you didn’t do the crime, or that you had a reasonable excuse for doing so. The court will then have a trial to decide whether you did. If the court decides that you did, this means you will be convicted, and the court will decide what sentence to give you.

Is the jury present at sentencing?

Judges often invite juries to sit during sentencing if it happens on the day of conviction, but not otherwise. Just sit in the public gallery.

How long after sentencing do you go to jail?

For instance, a judge may sentence the defendant with a fine, 30 days in jail suspended, and a year of probation. Felony sentences can come quickly, too, when the sentence is part of a plea bargain. In less than ten minutes, someone can be facing seven years in prison.

What types of cases do magistrates hear?

Magistrates deal with three kinds of cases:Summary offences. These are less serious cases, such as motoring offences and minor assaults, where the defendant is not entitled to trial by jury.Either-way offences. … Indictable-only offences.

Is going to Crown Court serious?

Indictable only offences are those that can only be tried in the Crown Court. They are the most serious offences on the criminal calendar. Because indictable only offences can only be tried in the Crown Court a defendant charged with an indictable only offence cannot have a trial at the Magistrates’ Court.

What are the 4 main types of sentencing?

Types of sentences include probation, fines, short-term incarceration, suspended sentences, which only take effect if the convict fails to meet certain conditions, payment of restitution to the victim, community service, or drug and alcohol rehabilitation for minor crimes.

What is the difference between Crown Court and Magistrates Court?

In a Magistrates’ Court a defendant’s guilt and subsequent sentence is decided by the Magistrates or a District Judge. There isn’t a jury in a Magistrates Court. Crown Courts deal with serious criminal cases which include: … Appeals against decisions of Magistrates’ Courts.

How long does it take to go from magistrates to crown court?

That takes place usually 4 weeks after the magistrates’ court hearing. That may sound like a long time in which to prepare, but it’s very important to speak to an experienced criminal defence solicitor as soon as you are charged with a crime.

Why would a case go to Crown Court?

The Crown Court – unlike the magistrates’ courts, it is a single entity – sits in 77 court centres across England and Wales. It deals with serious criminal cases which include: … Defendants convicted in magistrates’ courts, but sent to the Crown Court for sentencing due to the seriousness of the offence.

What type of cases go to Crown Court?

Cases handled by a crown court include:Indictable-only offences. These are serious criminal offences such as murder, manslaughter, rape and robbery.Either-way offences transferred from the magistrates court. … Appeals from the magistrates court.Sentencing decisions transferred from the magistrates court.

What is the minimum sentence at Crown Court?

The section requires that a Crown Court shall impose a minimum sentence of: 5 years imprisonment if the offender is aged 18 or over when convicted; or, 3 years detention under s. 91 PCC(S)A 2000 (long term detention) if the offender was under 18 but over 16 when the offence was committed.

Is Crown Court worse than magistrates?

Virtually all criminal court cases start in a magistrates’ court, and around 95% will be completed there. The more serious offences are passed on to the Crown Court, either for sentencing after the defendant has been found guilty in a magistrates’ court, or for full trial with a judge and jury.

What is the maximum sentence a crown court can give?

Committal for sentence example If an ABH is sentenced in the Magistrates’ Court the maximum sentence is 6 months’ imprisonment and/or a fine. If sentenced in the Crown Court the maximum sentence is 5 years’ imprisonment and/or a fine.